Tag Archives: indie

Long Way Down – Song Of The Day

BRMC

One of the very best tracks to come out of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club‘s 2010 album Beat The Devil’s Tattoo was “Long Way Down”, a slower track with a bittersweet vibe which builds beautifully. It’s dark and potentially a little depressing but there’s also a dash of hope in there which makes the song upbeat enough that, in the end, it comes off as surprisingly inspiring. Brilliant track.

IOU – Song Of The Day

IOU

Thinking about what would be the quintessential Metric song, a few came to mind but the strongest contender would probably be the opening track from the band’s Old World Underground, Where Are You Now? album “IOU”. The song is like a mini best of with the band showing off a bit of rock, a bit of punk, a bit of electro, a lot of versatility over the space of a single song and it all somehow works pretty seamlessly. It’s a fast-paced, fun tune but it’s also not without it’s softer, more chilled-out moments.

Nantes – Song Of The Day

Nantes

Beirut‘s 2007 album The Flying Club Cup was pretty perfect and the second track on the album, “Nantes”, was not only one of the best on it but remains one of Beirut’s most recognisable tracks. The usual Balkan folk-influenced vibe is there along with a whole bunch of accordions, trumpets and other relatively exotic instruments. The music video, which sees maestro Zach Condon walk down a flight of stairs behind the rest of the band is also particularly inspired.

Ginger – Song Of The Day

Ginger

That David Devant & His Spirit Wife‘s popularity didn’t increase past the good old Britpop days is a shame as they were always a lot of fun. Their songs were usually packed with tons of surreal silliness and biting piss-takery and our Song Of The Day, “Ginger”, is no exception. Think Blur with more of a New Wavy vibe and less straight-up art school douchiness.

You can find the track on the band’s 1997 album Work, Lovelife, Miscellaneous.

Final Solution – Song Of The Day

Peter Murphy

Seeing as this is Friday and on Fridays we deal primarily with cover songs here at Feedback Theatre, I thought our Song Of The Day for today should be a cover so here we have “Final Solution” not by the great Pere Ubu, who first recorded the song back in 1976, but by the great Peter Murphy, who made it his own later on.

You Can Call Me Al – Song Of The Day

Chevy Chase

From Paul Simon‘s 1986 album Graceland, “You Can Call Me Al” is still one of the artist’s most recognisable tracks and it is a good one: fun, catchy, varied, boasting a kickass bass solo. That being said, it’s the video and its simplicity which sells it as Simon and Chevy Chaseenter a room as the latter lip-syncs the entire song with all the old Chevy Chase charm which made the 80’s that little bit more awesome.

Zoomed Way Out – Album Review

Zoomed Way Out

From Washington D.C. comes The Very Small, a brand new rock band with a cool 90’s vibe, a unique bubbly sound and the kind of creativity that’s sorely needed on the indie rock scene at the moment. Through a healthy mix of heavy guitar work, skilfully layered vocals and fun, instantly likeable and memorable melodies, The Very Small (Robin Smith, Aaron Mann, Zack Berman) are on their way up.

These guys have something special so it’s definitely worth checking ’em out.

Case and point: their new album Zoomed Way Out, which follows their first self-titled effort The Very Small, released back in 2008. While first albums bear the pressure of introducing us to a band, second albums usually face the struggle of either matching the first album’s fresh burst of “new” or solidifying an, as yet, not quite polished sound.

Have The Very Small managed to bypass the curse of the second album?

SPOILERS: yup.

The first song, dramatically titled “URGENT!”, is packed with energy, catchy riffs, defiant lyrics and vocals almost reminiscent of some of Big Audio Dynamite‘s work: there’s a punky Mick Jones-esque tone to parts of the song. Having said that, this first track does give you a decent idea of what a rockier, U.S. version of Blur would have sounded like back in the day.

The new single, “Said And Done”, is next and was definitely the right choice to represent Zoomed Way Out since it boasts one of the catchiest melodies on the album, a hook that quickly gets in your head and never leaves. Which isn’t a bad thing, especially since said hook is given space to breathe among a fast-paced beat and booming riffs, never allowing it ot get repetitive.

The following track, “Timers”, is a softer, more heartfelt track with a futher emphasis on mood. The varying, electric structure of the song taking you different places emotionally as the drums cleverly suggest a “timer”-style beat.

“Don’t Forget The Lie” follows and that one starts with ominous chants and a chilled-out beat, it’s another softer track with a haunting quality to it. It does pick up quickly, though, adding in the odd dose of anger and bitterness every now and then. “Unsaid” then tricks you into believing you’re listening to another slower track before plugging in and mixing it up playfully. There’s some great guitar riffs underlining the verses in this one and the drums, which get increasingly inventive, support the catchy vocals perfectly.

Title track “Zoomed Way Out” is next and seems to know it’s a title track and therefore has to be particularly good and particularly different right off the bat as it builds up slowly but surely with a blend of purposeful simplicity and an atmospheric, head-infesting melody. It’s easily one of the best tracks on the album and it lives up to its self-titled status. Do look out for some unexpected instruments making a cameo appearance and one of the coolest and best-timed breaks I’ve heard in a while near the end.

Next up is “PB & J”, a much more experimental track with some spacey, layered vocals, an eclectic beat and a mysterious feel. You might not know what to make of this one at first but, trust me, by the end of it (it’s a short one) it should have grown on you nicely. “Thinking Out Loud” is a sharp turn into heavier, Foo Fighters-esque territory and that proves to be yet another surprising direction for The Very Small to go into and, against all odds, completely nail. It’s this reviewer’s personal favourite on the album: its always evolving structure, screaming vocals and non-stop energy are simply irresistible.

“Sonidos Lupinos” brings with it more cowbell (gotta have more cowbell!), funky bass-lines and a dancier, more latino beat. It’s a thoroughly entertaining and playful track you’ll want to hear all the way through as, once again, it goes interesting, unpredictable places. Song number 10 is “At Her Sight”, a folk-style ballad in which the vocals choir around the chorus, turning it into a pretty, nostalgic refrain.

Finally, we have “The Worst Form Of Violence”, which starts with a simple-ish, regular piano rhythm before those uniquely layered vocals which would make The Proclaimers jealous show up, prompting another experimental track but one that tops off the album with a nifty mix of everything the band does best. You never know where the song will take you but wherever it goes, you’re more than happy to trust it and let it work its magic.

So there you have it, The Very Small’s second album and it’s one accomplished, remarkably well put-together piece of early 2000’s grungy angst, retro-friendly alternative melodies and vibrant, up-to-date freshness packed full of terrific ideas and songs you’ll want to discover and rediscover. There’s an effortless versatility to this band that’s undeniably promising and I, for one, look forward to what The Very Small has in store next!

In the meantime, be sure to listen to Zoomed Way Out and their previous album, including the new single “Said And Done”. You can find The Very Small on Twitter (@TheVerySmall), on Facebook, Bandcamp and www.theverysmall.com.

That’s 4 Red Hot Chili Fellas out of 5 from us for Zoomed Way Out.

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Deserved.

Clones Of Clones – New Artist Spotlight

Clones Of ClonesHere’s a band you guys should really look into and expect great things from.

Clones Of Clones are an alternative rock band from Washington D.C. with some very promising output which looks set to blow-up in a massive, positive way very, very soon.

The band is Nick Scialli (Bass, Guitar, Vocals), Ben Payes (Guitar, Synth, Vocals), Brian Abbott (Drums) and Todd Evans (Guitar, Synth, Vocals) and their mission is to put together music you can instantly get behind and hang onto, while having a good time in the process.

There’s a versatility to their style which means that they can comfortably dip into more indie territory one second, tackle something a bit more bluesy the next and pick up a poppier vibe at times while still sounding like themselves and delivering fresh, well put-together tunes.

One of their EPs which you can find on SoundCloud is their 2013 debut Neighborhoods, a 4 track-long mini album with some killer psychedelic cover art and, of course, some cool music.

Case and point:

“Bully” is the second track from Neighborhoods and it certainly gets that slightly 90’s vibe across quite well with a catchy chorus, a chilled-out rhythm and some welcome attitude. The other tracks are also well worth listening to as the title song, “Neighborhoods”, boasts some great lyrics and both “Homie” and “Take Care Of Yourself” have a genuine emotional punch to them.

Do check out the band’s Youtube channel because you’ll be able to find those songs and much more on there.

Which brings us to the really cool part: there’s a new EP on the way and the teaser for its explosive title track “I Don’t Need Your Love” is up!

This is a short but sweet example of how good the full song and its video will be and, having listened and viewed both, I can safely say that this should be the breakout hit the band are looking for and deserve: its Black Rebel Motorcycle Club-esque swagger and catchy-as-hell chorus alone make this one a must-hear.

And, if every song on the EP is as good as this one, which I’m sure they are, then you’ll probably want to head over to iTunes come November 11th and purchase I Don’t Need Your Love because it’ll be worth it to say the least.

More information on Clones Of Clones can be found on their website and their Facebook page which you’re very welcome to “Like” (same goes for ours, hehehe).

The band is also active on Instagram and Twitter so there’s no excuse to not bring these Clones Of Clones into your lives, like, right now.

Expect a review of their new EP right here on Feedback Theatre soon enough!

Evil – Song Of The Day

Evil

Our Song Of The Day for today is Interpol‘s “Evil”, a somewhat gloomy single from their 2005 album Antics. It’s a cool, catchy, if rather dark song with a great melody and reliably moody vocals but it’s the video which really elevates it to a must-see/hear. The bizarre and kind of disturbing video in question depicts a car accident with some creepy-looking puppet kid (with real-looking teeth) singing as he gets taken to the hospital. Somehow, that works perfectly with the song, go figure.

Babsi – New Artist Spotlight

Pusca Logo 2

To say that up-and-coming London-based German singer Babsi is ambitious would be an understatement.

The artist has not only one but two promising projects underway which both serve to bring out both sides of her personality to the world musically.

Pusca are a band from North London, with Babsi on vocals, Damian Clay on guitar (and vocals) and John D on drums. Taking the narrative cues from traditional English and Celtic folk music, their material touches on the social and the personal, placing the story as the song. Their set recalls numerous musical influences that fuse into a dynamic Alt/Indie/Americana sound with a West Coast feel.

Edith Sitwell described them as, ‘Pearl Jam meets The Smiths at a party Lou Reed threw for Blondie.’

Here’s one of their videos for their heartfelt 90’s-style ballad “Shoot For You”:

When the alt. rock band, Kodiak Moon, split up, and the members were left looking to start a new project with a fresh new vocalist. In March 2012 they put out feelers far and wide to try and find a singer with the talent required to fit the bill and it would turn out that the vocalist they saw at the first audition, Babsi, would be the one they would finally select. Rehearsals began straight away, working on a number of the tracks drawn from the Kodiak Moon repertoire. But it soon became clear that Babsi was a different kind of vocalist with a subtle and yet defined approach to heading the band. So work also began on a new set of songs that took the now titled band, Pusca, into a more folky, poppy and jazzy direction.
Pusca
The band played their first gig at the Trinity Bar, Harrow, in June of 2012 and spend the rest of the year performing on the London circuit at venues like Surya, The Underbelly of Hoxton, The Enterprise, Camden Rock, The Mother Bar, Nambuca, The Water Rats, The O2 Academy and many more besides.
Here’s a sample from one of their Camden Rock gigs performed last year:
They began working on their first album, Secrets Half-Revealed in May 2013. The album was officially released in November of last year. You can find some of their work on their website.
By December, they even got festive and offered their fans a Christmas song:
In August 2013, Pusca played live to over 10,000 listeners on the Jonjo radio show at Rag Radio. The Youtube video of this acoustic performance has since gained almost 15,000 hits:

Pusca continue to concentrate on the London scene and are currently embarking on a series of gigs. Look out for their stuff over on Facebook where you can “LIKE” their page entitled, simply, “Pusca”.

This year, Babsi unveiled her solo project which opened with debut single “We Are Everywhere”, inspired by Stephen Fry’s idea that all athletes competing in the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics make a simple gesture, crossing their arms over their chests to show solidarity and support for the LGBT community of Russia. A gay rights protest music video was released and illustrated the gesture in an upbeat, positive yet defiant manner:

“Russia needs to understand that there are millions of people worldwide who are offended by the Russian government’s treatment of the LGBT community,” said Babsi, “I thought Stephen Fry had a fantastic idea to enable those participating in the games to be able to make a subtle protest.”

Damian Clay, who wrote the song and directed the video said, “It’s just too late now to try and convince ours or any other government to boycott the games in protest; though I believe that, were this racial or religious prejudice on display, that some countries would have stopped their teams attending. With that in mind it’s more important than ever that we have some way of letting the Russian LGBT community know that they have some support from the countries who are participating.”

Babsi

Gay presenter, Jonjo, who appears in the video, said, “It’s vitally important that this issue be front and centre throughout the course of this Olympiad. Ignoring it won’t make it go away. We’re a natural division of humanity; we need our rights respected and our people supported.”

“We Are Everywhere” is Babsi’s first release as a solo artist and she will be launching a solo album later this year, which will include this track.

We-Are-Everywhere

This single is currently available to buy on iTunes, do make sure you show your support if you can.

Expect many more great things from both Babsi and Pusca very soon.

For further information please contact:

Babsi Tel: 07753386822

Email: puscababsi@gmail.com